Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in Young Women with Blood Disorders

Kathryn E. Dickerson, Neethu M. Menon, Ayesha Zia

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  • 1 Citations

Abstract

Abnormal uterine bleeding is common in adolescents and is thought to affect 9% to 14% of women in their reproductive years. Certain unique aspects of underlying inherited or acquired blood disorders exacerbate the “expected” hormonal imbalance at this age, thereby increasing the morbidity of the underlying problem. A multifactorial etiology demands a collaborative approach between hematologists and gynecologists or adolescent medicine physicians to effectively manage abnormal uterine bleeding in young women with blood disorders.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages543-560
Number of pages18
JournalPediatric Clinics of North America
Volume65
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Uterine Hemorrhage
Adolescent Medicine
Morbidity
Physicians

Keywords

  • Abnormal uterine bleeding
  • Adolescents
  • Blood disorders
  • Heavy periods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in Young Women with Blood Disorders. / Dickerson, Kathryn E.; Menon, Neethu M.; Zia, Ayesha.

In: Pediatric Clinics of North America, Vol. 65, No. 3, 01.06.2018, p. 543-560.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Dickerson, Kathryn E. ; Menon, Neethu M. ; Zia, Ayesha. / Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in Young Women with Blood Disorders. In: Pediatric Clinics of North America. 2018 ; Vol. 65, No. 3. pp. 543-560.
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