Gulf War illness associated with abnormal auditory P1 event-related potential: Evidence of impaired cholinergic processing replicated in a national sample

Gail D. Tillman, Jeffrey S. Spence, Richard W. Briggs, Robert W Haley, John Hart, Michael A. Kraut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Our team previously reported event-related potential (ERP) and hyperarousal patterns from a study of one construction battalion of the U.S. Naval Reserve who served during the 1991 Persian Gulf War. We sought to replicate these findings in a sample that was more representative of the entire Gulf War-era veteran population, including male and female participants from four branches of the military. We collected ERP data from 40 veterans meeting Haley criteria for Gulf War syndromes 1–3 and from 22 matched Gulf War veteran controls while they performed an auditory oddball task. Reports of hyperarousal from the ill veterans were significantly greater than those from the control veterans, and P1 amplitudes in Syndromes 2 and 3 were significantly higher than P1 amplitudes in Syndrome 1, replicating our previous findings. Many of the contributors to the generation of the P1 potential are also involved in the regulation of arousal and are modulated by cholinergic and dopaminergic systems—two systems whose dysfunction has been implicated in Gulf War illness. These differences among the three syndrome groups where their means were on either side of controls is a replication of our previous ERP study and is consistent with previous imaging studies of this population.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages7-15
Number of pages9
JournalPsychiatry Research - Neuroimaging
Volume283
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 30 2019

Fingerprint

Gulf War
Veterans
Evoked Potentials
Cholinergic Agents
Persian Gulf Syndrome
Arousal
Population

Keywords

  • Desert shield
  • Desert storm
  • Dopaminergic
  • ERP
  • Hyperarousal
  • Neurotoxic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Gulf War illness associated with abnormal auditory P1 event-related potential : Evidence of impaired cholinergic processing replicated in a national sample. / Tillman, Gail D.; Spence, Jeffrey S.; Briggs, Richard W.; Haley, Robert W; Hart, John; Kraut, Michael A.

In: Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging, Vol. 283, 30.01.2019, p. 7-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b329508ec82e45c3966e374380906d87,
title = "Gulf War illness associated with abnormal auditory P1 event-related potential: Evidence of impaired cholinergic processing replicated in a national sample",
abstract = "Our team previously reported event-related potential (ERP) and hyperarousal patterns from a study of one construction battalion of the U.S. Naval Reserve who served during the 1991 Persian Gulf War. We sought to replicate these findings in a sample that was more representative of the entire Gulf War-era veteran population, including male and female participants from four branches of the military. We collected ERP data from 40 veterans meeting Haley criteria for Gulf War syndromes 1–3 and from 22 matched Gulf War veteran controls while they performed an auditory oddball task. Reports of hyperarousal from the ill veterans were significantly greater than those from the control veterans, and P1 amplitudes in Syndromes 2 and 3 were significantly higher than P1 amplitudes in Syndrome 1, replicating our previous findings. Many of the contributors to the generation of the P1 potential are also involved in the regulation of arousal and are modulated by cholinergic and dopaminergic systems—two systems whose dysfunction has been implicated in Gulf War illness. These differences among the three syndrome groups where their means were on either side of controls is a replication of our previous ERP study and is consistent with previous imaging studies of this population.",
keywords = "Desert shield, Desert storm, Dopaminergic, ERP, Hyperarousal, Neurotoxic",
author = "Tillman, {Gail D.} and Spence, {Jeffrey S.} and Briggs, {Richard W.} and Haley, {Robert W} and John Hart and Kraut, {Michael A.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1016/j.pscychresns.2018.11.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "283",
pages = "7--15",
journal = "Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging",
issn = "0925-4927",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gulf War illness associated with abnormal auditory P1 event-related potential

T2 - Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging

AU - Tillman, Gail D.

AU - Spence, Jeffrey S.

AU - Briggs, Richard W.

AU - Haley, Robert W

AU - Hart, John

AU - Kraut, Michael A.

PY - 2019/1/30

Y1 - 2019/1/30

N2 - Our team previously reported event-related potential (ERP) and hyperarousal patterns from a study of one construction battalion of the U.S. Naval Reserve who served during the 1991 Persian Gulf War. We sought to replicate these findings in a sample that was more representative of the entire Gulf War-era veteran population, including male and female participants from four branches of the military. We collected ERP data from 40 veterans meeting Haley criteria for Gulf War syndromes 1–3 and from 22 matched Gulf War veteran controls while they performed an auditory oddball task. Reports of hyperarousal from the ill veterans were significantly greater than those from the control veterans, and P1 amplitudes in Syndromes 2 and 3 were significantly higher than P1 amplitudes in Syndrome 1, replicating our previous findings. Many of the contributors to the generation of the P1 potential are also involved in the regulation of arousal and are modulated by cholinergic and dopaminergic systems—two systems whose dysfunction has been implicated in Gulf War illness. These differences among the three syndrome groups where their means were on either side of controls is a replication of our previous ERP study and is consistent with previous imaging studies of this population.

AB - Our team previously reported event-related potential (ERP) and hyperarousal patterns from a study of one construction battalion of the U.S. Naval Reserve who served during the 1991 Persian Gulf War. We sought to replicate these findings in a sample that was more representative of the entire Gulf War-era veteran population, including male and female participants from four branches of the military. We collected ERP data from 40 veterans meeting Haley criteria for Gulf War syndromes 1–3 and from 22 matched Gulf War veteran controls while they performed an auditory oddball task. Reports of hyperarousal from the ill veterans were significantly greater than those from the control veterans, and P1 amplitudes in Syndromes 2 and 3 were significantly higher than P1 amplitudes in Syndrome 1, replicating our previous findings. Many of the contributors to the generation of the P1 potential are also involved in the regulation of arousal and are modulated by cholinergic and dopaminergic systems—two systems whose dysfunction has been implicated in Gulf War illness. These differences among the three syndrome groups where their means were on either side of controls is a replication of our previous ERP study and is consistent with previous imaging studies of this population.

KW - Desert shield

KW - Desert storm

KW - Dopaminergic

KW - ERP

KW - Hyperarousal

KW - Neurotoxic

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056703024&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85056703024&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2018.11.006

DO - 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2018.11.006

M3 - Article

VL - 283

SP - 7

EP - 15

JO - Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging

JF - Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging

SN - 0925-4927

ER -